Biologists turn to citizens, DNA to count urban Alaska moose


Pilot File Photo

A moose cow leads her twin calves along the rocky shoreline of Mitkof Island at the south end of Wrangell Narrows in 2015. The calves were estimated to be a week old according to ADF&G game biologist Rich Lowell.

ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) - Moose thrive in Alaska's largest city with little to fear from natural predators such as wolves or bears, but getting an accurate count of the largest member of the deer family remains a challenge for the state wildlife biologists who must manage their numbers.

Traditionally, aerial surveys are performed from low-flying aircraft after there's snow on the ground when spotters can distinguish between male moose with antlers and cows without them, but flight rules from Anchorage's international airport prohibit the survey flights.

In response to those restrictions, the...

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